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ALGORITHMS:

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Algorithms I software environmental assesment

                 

DISPER: 1 indoor air quality solutions 2 environmental science and health 3 air emission monitoring 4 environmental assessment 5 industry air pollution pollution in our atmosphere 7 vehicles air pollution 8 gas dispersion modeling 9 indoor air quality measurement 10 acid rain and air pollution 11 industrial air exhaust 12 air pollution effects 13 acid rain pollution 14 air quality monitoring 15 air pollution model

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The mathematical model that the software uses provides options to model emissions from a wide range of sources that might be present at industrial areas and urban areas. The model is analogous to ISC3 from EPA. The basis of the model is the straight-line, steady-state Gaussian plume equation, which is used to model simple point source emissions from stacks, roads, storage piles and conveyor belts. Emission sources are categorized into three basic types of sources: point sources, line sources and area sources. The algorithms used to model each of these source types are described in detail in the following sections. The DISPER dispersion model accepts meteorological data records to define the conditions for plume rise and transport. The model estimates the concentration value for each source and receptor combination and calculates user-selected averages.

Point source emissions 

The model uses a steady-state Gaussian plume equation to model emissions from point sources, such as stacks.

The Gaussian Equation

The model for stacks uses the steady-state Gaussian plume equation for a continuous elevated source. For each source, the origin of the stack coordinate system is placed at the ground surface at the base of the stack. The x axis is positive in the downwind direction, the y axis is crosswind (normal) to the x axis and the z axis extends vertically. The fixed receptor locations are converted to each source's coordinate system. The hourly concentrations calculated for each source at each receptor are summed to obtain the total concentration produced at each receptor by the combined source emissions.

For a Gaussian plume, the hourly concentration at downwind distance x (meters) and crosswind distance y (meters) is given by:

c =(Q K V D/2 pi us sigy sigz) exp[-0.5(y/sigy)2]  (1)

where:

Q= pollutant emission rate (mass per unit time)

K= a scaling coefficient to convert calculated concentrations to desired units (default value of 1 x 106 for Q in g/s and concentration in g/m3)

V= vertical term (See Section 1.1.6)

D= decay term (See Section 1.1.7)

sigy,sigz= standard deviation of lateral and vertical concentration distribution (m) (See Section 1.1.5)

us= mean wind speed (m/s) at release height (See Section 1.1.3) 

 

 

 

 

environmental assesment

Environmental assesment: In general, the air dispersion models are an important tool to elaborate environmental reports. The emissions can be estimated through computer calculations in the environmental assesment.