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Algorithms VIII software air emission monitoring

                 

DISPER: 1 indoor air quality solutions 2 environmental science and health 3 air emission monitoring 4 environmental assessment 5 industry air pollution pollution in our atmosphere 7 vehicles air pollution 8 gas dispersion modeling 9 indoor air quality measurement 10 acid rain and air pollution 11 industrial air exhaust 12 air pollution effects 13 acid rain pollution 14 air quality monitoring 15 air pollution model

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The Vertical Term

The Vertical Term (V) accounts for the vertical distribution of the Gaussian plume. It includes the effects of source elevation, receptor elevation and plume rise. In addition to the plume height, receptor height and mixing height, the computation of the Vertical Term requires the vertical dispersion parameter (sigz). The Vertical Term without deposition effects is then given by:

V= exp{-0.5 [(zr-he)/ sigz]2}+exp{-0.5 [(zr+he)/ sigz]2}+

+{exp[-0.5 (H1/sigz)2]+exp[-0.5 (H2/sigz)2]}i=1,2,...+

+{exp[-0.5 (H3/sigz)2]+exp[-0.5 (H4/sigz)2]}i=1,2,...(34)

where:

he = hs + Dh

H1 = zr - (2izi - he)

H2 = zr + (2izi - he)

H3 = zr - (2izi + he)

H4 = zr + (2izi + he)

zr = receptor height above ground (flagpole) (m)

zi = mixing height (m)

The infinite series term in Equation {} accounts for the effects of the restriction on vertical plume growth at the top of the mixing layer. This equation assumes that the mixing height in rural and urban areas is known for all stability categories.

The model make the following assumption about plume behavior in elevated simple terrain (terrain that exceeds the stack base elevation but is below the release height):

The plume axis remains at the plume stabilization height as it passes over elevated or depressed terrain.

The mixing height is terrain following.

The wind speed is a function of height above sea level.

Thus, a modified plume stabilization height he_ is substituted for the effective stack height he in the Vertical Term given by Equation (1-50). For example, the effective plume stabilization height at the point x, y is given by:

he=he+zs-z(x,y)           (35)

where:

zs= height above mean sea level of the base of the stack (m)

z(x,y)= height above mean sea level of terrain at the receptor location (x,y) (m) 

It should also be noted that, the ISC models truncate terrain at stack height as follows: if the terrain height z - zs exceeds the source release height, the elevation of the receptor is automatically chopped off at the physical release height. The user is cautioned that concentrations at these complex terrain receptors are subject to considerable uncertainty.

 

 

air emission monitoring

Air emission monitoring: DISPER software can be used in combination with monitoring systems. It is an important tool to study environmental health in afected areas by pollution.